DFDepressed FanDepressed Fan

All  

Sixers

, all the time

Game 21 Stats: Reverse Boxscore and PER

http://www.depressedfan.com/img/SixersCavs.jpg
I've been somewhat out of commission posting-wise because of the holidays and work, but I've been thinking of a simpler version of my "Differential Production" (DP) statistic.  I'm sure the idea isn't new: calculate a reverse boxscore for a game.  Next to a player's name will be the statistics of all the players he was guarding.  The totals of the reverse boxscore should equal the team totals of the opposing team.

A few notes about calculating the reverse boxscore:
  • Unlike in the DP calculation, I don't divide blame for opponent field goals (or free throws) made.  I try to determine who is the most culpable for a given play.  On switches and fastbreaks, this is somewhat subjective.
  • Rebounds and assists are assigned to whichever player was most recently guarded by or guarding the player who attained the rebound or assist.
  • Steals, blocks, turnovers, and fouls drawn are always assigned directly.
In the reverse boxscore, turnovers and fouls (drawn) are "good," while all other categories are "bad."  The goal is to achieve a low opponent FG percentage and low totals in other categories.  The Cleveland game on 12/7 was an interesting case study, because while the Sixers excelled on offense, they weren't great on defense.
 
Here is the reverse boxscore for the Sixers in the 12/7 game vs. the Cavs.

MP FGM-A 3PM-A FTM-A OR-TR AST PF ST TO BL PTS
AI 36 3-6 0-1 2-2 1-2 0 6 1 2 1 8
EB 30 6-11 0-1 3-4 0-5 0 2 0 2 0 15
SH 32 3-13 1-2 3-4 3-7 4 3 0 1 0 10
JH 40 8-15 3-7 0-0 0-2 8 5 1 1 1 19
JM 30 3-6 0-0 0-0 0-3 5 0 2 0 1 6
TY 28 8-14 3-5 0-1 1-6 1 2 0 2 0 19
LW 21 5-7 0-0 1-2 0-1 3 4 0 2 0 11
ET 15 3-5 0-1 2-2 0-2 1 0 1 1 0 8
AN 8 0-1 0-0 1-2 0-1 0 0 0 1 0 1
Tot 240 39-78 7-17 12-17 5-29 22 22 5 12 3 97

A few notes about the reverse boxscore:
  • Spencer Hawes was even better than his stats indicated.  I couldn't believe how many shots he challenged off switches.  He had his usual problems covering the pick-and-roll, but he more than made up for it with his rebounding and help defense.
  • Thad Young was high scorer in the game, but tying for 2nd-high scorer (with Lou) was Bizarro Thad Young, along with Bizarro Jrue Holiday.
  • Iguodala impressively "fouled out" his opponents.
With these stats and the conventional boxscore stats, we can compute PER and opponent PER for the game.  I wrote a program to do this, making a few assumptions along the way (if you want to know what they were, ask me offline -- it's probably too boring for most people).  But here are the results:

PER OPP PER
AI 18.4 4.6
EB 18.3 12.6
SH 21.4 6.0
JH 15.9 17.1
JM 4.6 17.3
TY 50.2 15.9
LW 37.7 15.5
ET -1.1 23.1
AN 21.5 -6.9
Tot 20.9 12.5

Some comments about the PER results:
  • Thad and Lou had ridiculously high PERs, leading the team to an impressive total PER of 20.5 (PER is normalized to 15.0).
  • Iguodala and Hawes led the way on defense to a team opponent PER of 12.5.
  • Looking closely at the PER calculation, one can see why SFs typically have low opponent PERs, because SFs get relatively few rebounds and assists.  PFs and Cs see higher opponent PERs because of rebounds (and blocks), while PGs see higher opponent PERs because of assists.
  • I was surprised by Meeks' low PER number, but then I saw that he didn't score overwhelmingly much or efficiently (16 points on 13 shots in 30 minutes), and his 3 turnovers outnumbered all his other ancillary positive stats combined (2 rebounds+assists+steals+blocks).
That's all I have for now.  Thoughts and comments welcome, as usual.  Depending on how the Boston game goes, I might have DP statistics for that game.