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Jrue Holiday Stat Rankings

jrue-vs-heat.jpg
This post is an extension of one that I did during the season.  The basic idea was to compare Jrue Holiday to his fellow starting point guards (PGs) in the NBA for a variety of statistics, to get an idea of where he ranks.  I've extended the mid-season post to include on-court/off-court statistics and (with Brian's help) Synergy-based defensive statistics.

In each row of the tables below is a statistic, Jrue's value for that statistic, Jrue's ranking among 30 starting PGs for that statistic, the mean of that statistic over 30 starting PGs, and the best and worst values for that statistic over 30 starting PGs.  I chose the starting PG for each team based on the PG with the most starts, which was usually the PG with the most minutes (there were three exceptions because of trades: Denver, LA Clippers, New Jersey).  An average ranking for a given statistic is 15th or 16th.

The stats are drawn from five sources:  82games.com, basketball-reference.com, basketballvalue.com, hoopdata.com, and mysynergysports.com.

The first table lists "overall" performance.  "Min Pct" is percentage of team minutes played.  "PER" is Player Effeciency Rating and "PER2" is 82games.com's version of it.  "WS" is Win Shares.  "OFR" is Offensive Rating and "DFR" is Defensive Rating (as reported by basketball-reference.com), both based on team points per 100 possessions of court time; "OFR2" and "DFR2" are 82games.com's slightly different versions of those stats.  "ON/OFF CT" is team point differential while the player is on or off the court.  "Simple Rating" is 82games.com's aggregation of PER differential and On/Off Court differential.  Jrue's average ranking over the 19 non-redundant stats in this table was about 16th (average).  He played more minutes than any other PG except Derrick Rose.  He was very strong in Defensive Win Shares (which is based mostly on Defensive Rating).  He ranked very highly in "OFR OFF," which means that the Sixers' offense fell apart when he was out.  He ranked poorly in "OPP PER2" (essentially defensive PER) with only two PGs worse (Wall and Baron Davis).  He was also poor in "DFR OFF," meaning that the Sixers' defense improved when he was off the floor.  Interesting non-Sixer note:  the worst PG in the league in terms of On Court/Off Court was Russell Westbrook, whose Thunder performed much better when he was off the court; we saw instances of this in the postseason.

JH Rank Avg Best Worst
MIN PCT 73 2t 59 76 32
PER 15.4 23 17.0 23.7 8.9
OWS 2.2 21 3.8 9.5 0.4
DWS 3.5 5 2.1 4.8 0.5
WS 5.7 17 5.9 13.9 1.9
WS/48 0.094 19 0.117 0.232 0.041
PER2 16.2 24 18.1 25.5 9.4
OPP PER2 19.0 28 16.9 12.6 20.6
PER2 DIF -2.8 25 1.2 10.5 -9.5
ON CT 2.9 15 1.2 9.3 -11.2
OFF CT -2.3 17 -1.9 -11.5 8.3
ON/OFF NET 5.2 10 3.0 17.0 -6.4
SIMPLE RATING -0.1 18 1.8 10.8 -3.8
OFR2 109 20t 109 115 102
DFR2 106 9t 108 102 116
NET/48 2.9 15 1.2 9.3 -11.2
OFR ON 108.3 21 108.7 113.9 101.0
OFR OFF 100.7 5 104.7 98.0 113.4
OFR NET 7.6 8 4.0 12.3 -3.2
DFR ON 105.5 10 107.7 101.3 114.4
DFR OFF 102.2 25 106.2 112.9 94.3
DFR NET -3.3 22 -1.5 5.2 -7.9
NET ON 2.8 14 1.0 9.9 -11.2
NET OFF -1.5 17 -1.5 -10.2 10.1
NET DIFF 4.3 10t 2.5 14.9 -8.2

The second table lists shooting and scoring statistics.  "EFG" is effective field goal percentage (takes into account 2-point and 3-point field goals), while "TS Pct" is true shooting percentage (also takes into account free throws).  "Jump Freq" and "Inside Freq" are the percentage of shot attempts that are jump shots vs. inside shots.  Usage rate is the percentage of team possessions used by the player (based on FG attempts and turnovers).  Jrue's average ranking over the 9 positive stats in this table (not including Jump/Inside Freq and Usage Rate) was 18th.  He was best at 3-point percentage, and the only really glaring weakness was free throw attempts per 48 minutes (which in turn weighed down his TS pct.).  His Usage Rate was not unreasonable given his shooting stats.  Interesting non-Sixer note:  no one shot jumpers more often than Mike Bibby (93%), who also turned in the highest jumper EFG (55%). 

JH Rank Avg High Low
EFG 48.7 13t 49.1 56.3 42.7
TS Pct 52.5 21 54.4 63.4 48.6
Jump Freq 73 15t 74.2 93 55
Jump EFG 45.8 14 44.9 55.2 34.2
Inside Freq 27 15t 25.8 45 7
Inside EFG 56.7 23 60.2 73.9 52.5
2P Pct 47.0 15 46.7 54.0 38.6
3P Pct 36.5 11t 34.3 44.2 10.8
FT Pct 82.3 19t 82.7 93.4 56.8
FTA/48 3.5 22 5.1 10.6 1.3
Pts/48 18.9 21 21.3 37.7 11.4
Usage Rate 20.8 19 21.4 32.2 12.8

The third table lists "secondary" statistics, based on passing, rebounding, steals, and blocks.  Assist Rate and Turnover Rate are from Hoopdata.com and are percentages of assists/turnovers relative to team possessions.  "Ast:BP" is assist-to-bad-pass ratio (excluding ball-handling turnovers), while "Ast:TO" is assist-to-turnover ratio (including all turnovers).  "Ast:Shot" is assists-to-shot-attempts, a measure of how often a player shoots vs. passes.  "STB:TO" is steals-plus-blocks-to-turnover ratio (a measure of possessions gained to possessions lost, though not all blocks lead to change-of-possession).  Rebound rates are percentages of rebounds relative to available rebounds.  Jrue's average ranking over the 12 positive stats in this table (not including Ast:Shot) was 13th.  He ranked highly in steals, blocks, and all the rebounding categories.  In the passing categories, he was slightly below average, but there were no rankings in the 20's.  Interesting non-Sixer note:  while Jrue's Assist Rate of 40.5% was at the median (16th), there was a group of six PGs whose Assist Rates were above 60%:  Kidd (81%), Rondo (79%), Calderon, Nash, Deron Williams, Paul.  Those six are widely considered the best passing PGs in the league; 7th place (Andre Miller) represented a large drop-off to 48%.     

JH Rank Avg Best Worst
Ast Rate 40.5 16 45.1 81.0 25.8
Ast/48 8.8 19 9.8 16.4 4.7
Ast:TO 2.43 19t 2.75 4.42 1.91
Ast:BP 4.1 18t 4.6 7.7 3.1
Ast:Shot 0.53 17 0.60 1.13 0.33
TOV Rate 16.7 18t 16.3 10.9 24.3
TOV/48 3.61 15 3.64 1.46 5.33
ST/48 1.99 14 1.91 3.13 0.92
BL/48 0.48 6 0.30 0.83 0.05
STB:TO 0.68 11 0.65 1.53 0.20
ORb Rate 2.7 7t 2.2 5.2 0.7
DRb Rate 10.5 8 9.8 13.4 6.6
TRb Rate 6.6 10 6.0 7.8
3.8

Finally, the last table lists man-to-man defensive statistics from Synergy.  Big thanks to Brian for compiling these stats.  "PPP" stands for points-per-possession.  "Iso" stands for isolation, "P/R" stands for pick-and-roll (ball-handler), "Post" stands for post-ups, "Spot" stands for spot-ups.  Jrue's average ranking for these stats was 15th.  His big strength was post-up defense (we saw evidence of this vs. Miami).  Interesting non-Sixer note:  Derrick Rose was at or near the top in every one of these categories.

JH Rank Avg Best Worst
PPP All 0.90 14t 0.89 0.78 1.00
PPP Iso 0.84 17 0.83 0.50 1.13
PPP P/R 0.84 19t 0.82 0.63 0.99
PPP Post 0.70 6 0.87 0.60 1.44
PPP Spot 1.03 17t 1.02 0.83 1.24

Overall, Jrue ranked average or slightly below average compared to his fellow starting PGs.  As others have noted, most of those ahead of him are also older or more experienced than he is, so these rankings bode well for his performance going forward -- if he continues to improve.  As I commented throughout the year, the area where he can improve the most is on defense.  In retrospect, I feel that because the team didn't have mobile big men who could cover the P&R well, Jrue developed some bad habits along the way.  But we saw in the playoffs that, with focused attention, most of the bad habits went away and his natural defensive talent was able to shine.

I've forwarded the raw spreadsheet to Brian, so you can see the details of the rankings (click here to download).  Your comments welcome, as always.


by Statman on Jun 8 2011
Tags: Basketball | Jrue Holiday | Sixers | Statman |